Ken Nwadiogbu: UBUNTU | Fumi Nakamura: Look Towards the Future, But Not So Far As To Miss Today

4217 W. Jefferson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90016
Mar 06, 12 PM - 6 PM — ends Mar 27, 2021
Thinkspace Projects
4217 W. Jefferson Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016

T: 310.558.3375 | Tues. - Sat. Noon to 6PM

Thinkspaceprojects.com
limited entry by appointment

Thinkspace Projects is pleased to present two brand new solo exhibitions. In Gallery One, Nigerian-born multidisciplinary artist Ken Nwadiogbu brings his first solo exhibition in the United States, ‘UBUNTU, I Am Because We Are.’ In twenty new hyperrealist works, Nwadiogbu investigates representation through a focal-point of eyes as a means of discovering and revelation. By recreating his own realities as a young Nigerian, his work projects the experiences encountered by black lives around the globe. Nwadiogbu invokes a humanist connection to the ongoing issues of police brutality, racism, xenophobia, culture conflict and shock. Working with charcoal and acrylic he creates a hyperrealist narrative that demands socio-political thought and discourse, bringing the ideology full circle by emphasizing an understanding that we are more alike than different.

Fumi Nakamura's ‘Look Towards the Future, But Not So Far As To Miss Today’ is a new body of work depicting flora and fauna. Each element is carefully selected to represent elements of life, memory, body and soul. Nakamura pulls from the subconscious, using metaphor and imagery to create striking pieces. Fumi Nakamura draws inspiration from the Japanese phrase meaning “language of flower.” In line with this concept, each flower has different meanings right down to the positioning. Colors play a huge role as well, and each work becomes full of phrases and meanings. One tulip can mean a variety of things from “compassion” to “confession of love” to the “lost love” of a white tulip. Different from her previous work in which she frequently incorporated negative space, this new series is filled up to the edges. Using custom “coffin” or “container” imagery, Nakamura takes inspiration from the funeral ceremony where we last see and connect with another being physically and reflect on the past together. This collection of works is layered and complex both in visuals and meaning.